Time and editing (en español al final)

•July 24, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Why do you do photos? Is there something very deep in your mind about preserving something, about capturing something? Would you still pick the same pictures after 10, 20, 30 years? How has your perception been changed by time, by the context? When you start building a big archive of pictures you stop asking to yourself this thing at least one time in your life. Good pictures are good pictures and the context isn’t relevant. Or yes?
Cartier Bresson said: “All the maybes should go to the trash”. He was brave enough to burn, sometime in the 30’s, all his “maybes” and he preserved only a box with the edited frames. He also didn’t leave a side frame in some negatives. He precisely cut only the chosen photo.
I wonder sometimes about all the film undeveloped and unedited left by photographers like Eugene Smith, Garry Winogrand and Vivian Maier. Would they choose other photos that now have added meaning because the time?
Usually, photographers who are very experienced, begin to see in their archives the possibilities to publish books or new collections of images. But are there hidden other reasons, some curiosity, to see how we saw the world before?

One of the photos that Frank Horvat picked from his old archives.

One of the photos that Frank Horvat picked from his old archives.


The French photographer Frank Horvat, who has extensive experience doing photos and had, for my taste, a brilliant idea editing one photo per day of 1999, replied to me that “some meanings are modified by time: a DS Citroen in a street scene, which was the latest advance in technology, is to our eyes a vintage car. But my criteria for composition are the same, I would choose the same images on a contact sheet.”
-Did you change your approach about editing? If yes, how was it then and how is it now?
-The change is that first with slides, then with digital files, the way I shot was different. For instance now I don’t do any bracketing, which saves time and shots.
-What are some parts of the processes of editing that you consider the most difficult? Why?
-Nothing difficult, once you know what you are looking for. The only difficulty is that I tend to first eliminate what I don’t want, than to look for what I want – which may be a waste, because some disturbing details could be corrected by photoshop.
-This means that you don’t mind erasing a part of the original photo to make it more appealing?
-Interesting point. If I make your portrait, and you have a pimple on your nose, I have no qualms about photoshopping away that pimple – just as ‘traditional’ photographers didn’t have qualms about retouching it with a little brush and black or white ink. IF I decide that the pimple is not part of the story I want to tell about you. Photography may be a way of witnessing, but the witness is me, not the camera. If I am a journalist and witness in writing, there is no moral reason for me not to make some changes in my description, if the morning after I feel that it does not fit my impression. The idea of the camera being the witness is fallacious. No jury would (or should) accept it. And photoshop helped us to realize this.
-In any case, if there was some change in your editing, was the reason because the technologies changed or were there others reasons?
-The technologies, but of course also my body, my mind, my interest, my taboos. Four years ago I photographed a sexual intercourse which twenty years ago I wouldn’t have dared to do.
In the case of one of the founders of VII agency, Christopher Morris saw part of his work with a different perspective. “I think there are a lot of flaws in modern photojournalism -he said in a interview published by Proof blog-, at least since the 90’s. There’s a lot of bad photography in photojournalism, a lot of successful bad photography. I was guilty of it in the 90’s myself. It started with the invention of these zoom lenses that photographers use, these 16mm-35mm zooms. Too often in photojournalism I see photographers trying to show too much in the frame, causing too much drama and emotion through lens selection. When I say “lens selection” I mean they’re using the distortion of the lens to create drama. The real masters of photography don’t rely on that kind of trick. In so much photojournalism the images don’t contain the viewer. There is so much space in their framing and composition that the viewer gets lost and ends up leaving the images.”
I believe that the best photos are taken when we are like most animals, without consciousness of time, when we make a record of something whose meaning will last beyond our own lives. My friend Barry Milyovsky wrote me: “Taking pictures is not exactly a passion for me, it is something I do, just as I eat and sleep and walk, etc.” And then he commented about a note pinned in Ávarez Bravo’s darkroom, the well known mexican photographer, that said: “Hay tempo” (there is time).
I wonder if some of my images will last. What I would save/edit if I would have choice. But is impossible to know what will be of interest in the future. For many Leo Tolstoy was right when he said: “If you want to be universal, paint your own village”. I was in doubt all my life about the value of some personal photos. I always asked to myself: “who cares?” But now that I added so many images to this world I started to rethink the value of some of them. There are obsessions that follow every photographer. Then, what is the point to say something with a photo, because that is what we do every time we push the button. By the way, Horvat assures us that photography is “the art of not pushing the button”. Again the editing present. I believe that time lets us understand why we do what we do sometimes because we begin to see the repetition in our path.
The writer Jorge Luis Borges said: “Time is the best anthologist, the only one maybe”. I am not sure if he was right, as Chris Morris I think that there is a lot of successful bad photography, not only in photojournalism. And successful for who, the people of this time or other time? I always remember Van Gogh who never was sure about if he was doing things right and barely sold only one painting during his life.
Here in South America there is a common phrase: “time will tell”, like if we could arrive to the truth at some end. Maybe Borges understood this common wisdom. I will take another idea of this writer, that one that says that with time we will be able to find a map made with all those photos (he said writings) because there is something that needs to emerge. Then, we would be only a tool, like a camera. A tool of the time.

Tiempo y edición

Por qué hacés fotos? Hay algo muy profundo en tu mente relativo a preservar algo, capturar algo. Elegirías las mismas fotos después de 10, 20, 30 años? Como es cambiada nuestra percepción por el tiempo, por el contexto? Cuando empezás a construir un gran archivo de fotos terminás preguntandote a ti mismo esto al menos una vez en la vida. Las fotos buenas son buenas y no es relevante el contexto. O sí?
Cartier Bresson dijo: “Todos los quizá deben ir a la basura”. Fue lo bastante atrevido como para quemar, alrededor de los años 30, todos sus “quizá” y preservó sólo una caja con los cuadros editados, inclusive no dejó un segundo cuadro en el negativo. El cortó precisamente sólo la foto seleccionada.
Me pregunto a veces sobre toda esa película sin revelar y editar que dejaron fotógrafos como Eugene Smith, Garry Winogrand y Vivian Maier. Elegirían ellos otras fotos para agregar ahora significados debido al tiempo?
El fotógrafo francés Frank Horvat, quien tiene una extensa experiencia haciendo fotos y tuvo, para mi gusto, una idea brillante editando una foto por día durante todo 1999, me respondió que “algunos significados son modificados por el tiempo: Un Citroen DS en una escena de calle, el cual era el último avance de la tecnología, es a nuestros ojos un auto vintage. Pero mi criterio de composición es el mismo, elegiría las mismas imágenes en la copia de contacto”.
-Cambió su enfoque respecto a la edición? si es así, como era antes y como es ahora?
-El cambio es que primero con la película y luego con los archivos digitales, la forma que disparo es diferente. Por ejemplo ahora no hago varias mismas tomas con diferente exposición (bracketing), lo que me ahorra tiempo y disparos.
-Hay alguna parte del proceso de edición que vos considerás la más difícil? por qué?
-Nada difícil, una vez que vos sabés lo que estás buscando. La única dificultad es que tiendo primero a eliminar lo que no quiero en vez de mirar lo que busco. Lo que puede ser una pérdida de tiempo porque algunos detalles inquietantes pueden ser corregidos con Photoshop.
-Esto significa que no le importa borrar una parte de la foto original para hacerla más atractiva?
-Interesante. Si te hago un retrato y tenés un grano en la nariz, no tengo reparos en photoshopear el grano al igual que los fotógrafos tradicionales no tenían reparos en retocar con un pincel pequeño y tinta negra o blanca. Si decido que el grano no es parte de la historia que quiero contar sobre tí. La fotografía puede ser una forma de testimoniar, pero el testigo soy yo, no la cámara. Si soy un periodista y testigo que escribe, no hay razón moral, para mí, para no hacer cambios en mi descripción si la mañana despues yo siento que no corresponde a mi impresión. La idea de que la cámara es testigo es una falacia. Ningún jurado debería aceptarlo. Y el photoshop nos ayuda a realizar esto.
-En todo caso, si hubo algún cambio en su edición, se debe a las nuevas tecnologías u otro tema?
-Las tecnologías, pero por supuesto también mi cuerpo, mi mente, mi interés, mis tabúes. Cuatro años atrás fotografié un acto sexual lo cual veinte años atrás no me hubiera atrevido.
En el caso de uno de los fundadores de la agencia VII, Christopher Morris, él ve parte de su trabajo con una perspectiva diferente. “Creo que hay un montón de fallas en el fotoperiodismo moderno -dijo en una entrevista publicada por el blog Proof-, al menos desde los noventa. Hay un montón de mala fotografía en periodismo, mucha exitosa mala fotografía. Yo fuí culpable de eso en los 90´s. Comenzó con la invención de esos lentes zoom que se usan, esos 16-35 mm zooms. Demasiado frecuente en fotoperiodismo veo que los fotógrafos tratan de mostrar mucho en el cuadro provocando demasiado drama y emoción mediante la selección del lente. Cuando digo selección del lente me refiero a que ellos están usando la distorsión para crear drama. Los verdaderos maestros de la fotografía no dependían de esa clase de truco. Muchas de las imágenes del fotoperiodismo no contienen al espectador. Hay tanto espacio en el encuadre y composición que el espectador se pierde y termina dejando las imágenes”.
Yo creo que las mejores fotos son hechas cuando somos como la mayoría de los animales, sin consciencia del tiempo, cuando grabamos algo cuyo significado durará más que nuestras vidas. Mi amigo Barry Milyovsky me escribió:”Hacer fotos no es exactamente una pasión para mí, es algo que hago, como comer, dormir, caminar, etc.” Y luego me comentó sobre una nota que estaba clavada en el cuarto oscuro de Alvarez Bravo, el conocido fotógrafo mexicano, que decía: “Hay tempo”.
Me pregunto si alguna de mis imágenes durarán. Que editaría/salvaría si tuviera que tomar una elección. Pero es imposible saber que será de interés en el futuro. Para muchos Leon Tolstoi tenía razón cuando dijo: “Pinta tu aldea y pintarás el mundo”. Yo tuve dudas toda mi vida sobre el valor de algunas fotos personales. Siempre me pregunté: a quién le importa? Pero ahora que agregué tantas imágenes a este mundo empecé a repensar el valor de algunas de ellas. Hay obsesiones que siguen a cada fotógrafo. Luego, cuál es el punto de decir algo con una foto, porque eso es lo que hacemos cada vez que apretamos el botón. A propósito, Horvat asegura que la fotografía es “el arte de no apretar el botón”. Otra vez la edición presente. Creo que el tiempo nos ayuda a entender por qué hacemos lo que hacemos a veces porque empezamos a ver una senda de repeticiones.
El escritor Jorge Luis Borges dijo: “El tiempo es el mejor antólogo, quizá el único”. No estoy seguro si tenía razón, como Chris Morris creo que hay un montón de mala fotografía exitosa, no sólo en fotoperiodismo. Y exitosa para quién, la gente de este tiempo o de otro tiempo? Siempre recuerdo a Van Gogh quien nunca estuvo seguro sobre si estaba haciendo bien las cosas y apenas vendió una pintura en su vida.
Aquí en sudamérica hay una frase común: “el tiempo lo dirá”, como si pudiéramos arrivar a la verdad al final. Quizá Borges entendió algo de esta sabiduría popular. Tomaré otra idea de este escritor, la de que con el tiempo podremos encontrar un mapa hecho con todas las fotos (él dijo escritos) porque hay algo que necesita emerger. Entonces, sólo somos una herramienta, como una cámara. Una herramienta del tiempo.

Next time

•July 14, 2014 • Leave a Comment

We ended defeated by a hair, as we said here. Anyway, next time will be. Congratulations to the German team.

La próxima vez

Terminamos derrotados por un pelo, como decimos acá. Como sea, la próxima vez será. Felicitaciones al equipo Alemán.

Argentina vs Germany_BA_35

One of the most disliked teams at the final of the world cup

•July 10, 2014 • 1 Comment

Last June 10 the New York Times published an article based in a survey made in 19 countries. Argentina appeared as one of the most disliked world cup teams together with the US and Iran. But surveys about feelings don’t predict the future and now thousands of argentinians are celebrating to arrive to the final game that will be next sunday. Here is a peek of the frantic holiday that lived yesterday inhabitants of Buenos Aires. Hope next match against Germany would have so football as guts.

Uno de los equipos menos queridos a la final del mundial

El 10 de junio el New York Times publicó un artículo basado en una encuesta hecha en 19 países. Argentina apareció como uno de los equipos menos queridos junto con los EEUU e Iran. Pero las encuestas sobre sentimientos no predicen el futuro y ahora miles de argentinos están celebrando llegar a la final que será el próximo domingo. Aquí hay un ojeada a frenético feriado que vivieron ayer los habitantes de Buenos Aires. Espero que el próximo partido contra Alemania tenga tanto fútbol como agallas.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And published in media

Being a photographer in Argentina

•June 14, 2014 • Leave a Comment

(Ser fotógrafo en Argentina. Traducción al final)

Being a photographer in Argentina is pain in the ass during this times. The camera repairmen can´t import replaces. They are scarse or inexistent. More, some marks don´t have dealers here, those that have one or two don´t sell insumes because they can´t import them, the things you purchase from foreign countries, things that are not made locally, don´t arrive. The national mail wash their hands. Almost all the things used in photography are made by people in other countries but for a local policy the government not allowed to import them. There are no local industry that makes top professional photography things and I doubt there will be one. Our pesos have almost no value in relation with the dollar or the euros so all could rise a cost that means a little fortune. In spite of all that we try. We try hard to maintain doing what we love.
Now I am short of fiber baryte paper for digital pigment printing, I started to think to experiment mixing digital with analog.
First I planned doing paper negatives from a photo projected by an iphone. The photo is digital, that is the reason. I discarted do digital negatives because the translucent sheets are not distributed here. I take off the head of my enlarger and put the iphone at max brightness. Directly enlarguing is not convenient because it was enlargued too the pattern of the screen. I tried a size equal of the projected. I developed the paper negative after some tweaks because I only had outdated multicontrast paper. So I toned digitally the photo to add contrast with some ambar color (to mimic the effect of a grade filter 3 or 3+). The results were fine so when the paper was dry I scanned to have an idea how could look if I re photograph with film and enlargue with traditional methods. The scan showed me that the screen still appears. Dumb of me, I am still enlarguing a digital screened image. Maybe I could print some digital photos with analog methods showing a screen and less sharpness. Who knows, maybe this way I could be consider an artist and got money to travel to another place and purchase the paper I want and do the prints I like. Here are some crop examples at 100 percent enlargement and others to show the process and at the end the image that I use to do the test.

Addendum 16 june 2014: After more than six months I had today the good news from the national mail that my pouch I purchased finally arrived. Uff, that is something.

Ser fotógrafo en Argentina

Es un dolor en el culo en estos tiempos. El que repara cámaras no puede importar repuestos. Son escasos o inexistentes. Más, algunas marcas no tienen distribuidores aquí, aquellos que tienen uno o dos no venden insumos porque no pueden importarlos, las cosas que comprás provenientes de otros países, cosas que no son hechas localmente, no llegan. El correo nacional se lava las manos.
Casi todas las cosas usadas en fotografía son hechas por gente en otros países pero por una política local el gobierno no permite importarlas. No hay una industria local que fabrique lo mejor de la fotografía professional y dudo que vaya a haber una. Nuestros pesos no tienen casi valor en relación a los dólares y euros entonces todo puede elevar el costo a una pequeña fortuna. A pesar de todo eso nosotros tratamos. Tratamos duro seguir haciendo lo que amamos.
Ahora estoy corto de papel baritado para impresión de pigmentos. Empecé a pensar en experimentar una mezcla de digital con análogo.
Primero planeé hacer negativos de papel a partir de una imagen proyectada por un iphone. La foto es digital, esa es la razón. Descarté hacer negativos digitales porque los hojas transparentes no se distribuyen aquí. Saqué el cabezal de mi ampliadora y puse el iphone a su máxima capacidad de brillo. La ampliación directa no es conveniente porque hubiera ampliado también la trama de la pantalla. Traté con un tamaño igual al projectado. Revelé el negativo de papel después de algunos ajustes porque sólo me quedaba papel multicontraste vencido. Así que le dí un tono ambar digitalmente para agregar contraste (para mimetizar el efecto de un filtro grado 3 or 3+). Los resultados fueron ok así que cuando el papel se secó lo escaneé para tener una idea como podría lucir si re fotografiara con película para ampliar con los métodos tradicionales. El escaneo me mostró que las marcas de la pantalla aún aparece. Tonto de mí, aún estoy ampliando una imagen reproducida por una pantalla. Quizá pueda imprimir algunas fotos digitales con métodos analógicos mostrando la trama de la pantalla y menos nitidez. Quién sabe, quizá de esa forma pueda ser considerado un artista y conseguir dinero para viajar a otro lugar y comprar el papel que quiero y hacer las impresiones que me gustan. Aquí van algunos ejemplos ampliados al 100 porciento y otros para mostrar el proceso y al final la imagen que use de prueba.

Addenda 16 Junio 2014: Después de más de seis meses hoy tuve la buena noticia del correo nacional, mi bolsito para guardar cámara o lentes finalmente había llegado. Uff, eso es algo.

Scheme to make and idea of the process. Esquema para dar una idea del proceso.

Scheme to make and idea of the process. Esquema para dar una idea del proceso.

The negative papers still in fixer. Los negativos de papel aún el fijador.

The negative papers still in fixer. Los negativos de papel aún el fijador.

a paper negative made with outdated paper. Un negativo de papel hecho con papel vencido.

a paper negative made with outdated paper. Un negativo de papel hecho con papel vencido.

100% crop of a digital printed process enlarging. Ampliación al 100% del proceso de ampliación y copiado digital.

100% crop of a digital printed process enlarging. Ampliación al 100% del proceso de ampliación y copiado digital.

The screen is visible at 100% crop. La pantalla es visible al ampliar al 100 %

The screen is visible at 100% crop. La pantalla es visible al ampliar al 100 %

Composing in milliseconds (en español al final)

•March 20, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Emiliano Lasalvia WPP Sports

INDIVIDUAL-DEPORTE-004

(English version with the very necessary help of my friend Barry Milyovsky)

“The prize means for me that I went from a total unknown to a lesser unknown, no more than that”, minimized Emiliano Lasalvia, a former student of astronomy who grew up in Bariloche, Argentina, and started to do football (soccer) photos in 2002 and who this year won the first place of the World Press Photo (WPP) in the Sports Action category with a photo about a Polo player falling.
“Prizes arrive after work, not before. The quiet moment I am now having makes me think of things in a different way”, commented Emiliano who appeared very happy for all the warm congratulations from his colleagues.
The truth is that it was not the first polo player falling photo that he did but it was the fist he sent to the well known international competition. The image was made for La Nacion newspaper where Emiliano is a permanent collaborator with a Canon EOS 1 D Mark IV camera that each three shots generates a photo that looks like an old process of color separation layers. “That is how it is to work in Argentina”, he commented, reckoning that there was also a luck factor because the winning photo could be an error, impossible to publish.
-How is the state of photojournalism in Argentina?
-Lamentably we are camera operators more than photojournalists, is very difficult to practice a profession in a country where the communication media give no importance to who generates the images, where newspapers like Perfil dismissed colleagues and where instead of thinking of the image as a new dimension of the discourse the image is sought to literally legitimize the text.
-What do you think about the information that between 8 and 9 percent of the preselected images by the WPP jury ended being disqualified because there was some kind of manipulation?
-It is very hard for me to understand a photographer that alters the images, it is as though he lost the sense of the task. It is, maybe, a certain need to be legitimate at any price instead of giving attention to the thing that one does. It is a kind of trap of this system. I guess that the photographers that alter or suppress things need to legitimize in a perverse system to work more or to reach some work where they want or need instead of thinking about what is genuine in photography.
-What do you mean by perverse? What is the origin of this perversity?
-It is originated in the media and with photographers who want the legitimation of the awards. The sensibility of the photographer is quickly replaced by the RAW process, the suppression of objects and other superficial alterations that start a run to a sensationalist photo, and yield to the request of this system is what appears to me perverse. I saw many more colleagues concerned by what they will do with the photos and not by what they will tell with them.
-How much has sports photography changed since you began?
-The constant improvement in the technology makes obtaining a standard sports photo more accessible, that the only thing necessary to obtain this kind of photo is the spending power to have the adequate equipment. The issue is to give a turn more to that and try to find an aesthetic and the composition inside an unrepeatable and ethereal moment. Time before I worried to catch the action of what was succeeding, now I have the tranquility to search the place from where I want to catch the action that will occur.
-Is sports photography an oasis in relation to other categories of photojournalism? I mean that is there still money to send photographers to do some traveling and there are concrete assignments?
-Is it where one can make a difference with respect to an amateur or someone that is not trained in this way. The media continue justifying the assignments to sports events. It is a possibility to go out of the every day routine, I would not call that an oasis, I would call it a possibility.
-To go out of the routine in what sense?
-To go out of that literality that we talked about before.
Although successful in the world of sports photography, Emiliano confessed to be more interested “in documentation, in photos more aesthetic or poetic made during some kind of journalistic event”. He practices too with enthusiasm his abilities to make and edit video.
A curious fact is that he is a close friend and grew up together another Argentinian awarded by the WPP in 2001, Carlos Barría. Both studied in the same photojournalism school of the Argentine Association of Photojournalists, ARGRA by his name in spanish (Asociación de Reporteros Gráficos de Argentina). The same place where were formed another argentinians that received the same award, Rodrigo Abd and Walter Astrada.


Componiendo en milisegundos

“El premio significa para mi que pasé de ser un total desconocido a un poco menos desconocido, no mucho más que eso”, minimizó Emiliano Lasalvia, el ex estudiante de astronomía proveniente de Bariloche, Argentina, que empezó a hacer fotos de fútbol en 2002 y que este año ganó el primer premio del World Press Photo (WPP) en la categoría de Deportes de Acción con una foto de una caída de un jugador de polo. “Los premios llegan después del trabajo, no antes. La tranquilidad en la que estoy ahora hace que uno piense las cosas de manera distinta”, comentó Emiliano quien se mostró feliz por la cantidad de muestras de cariño de parte de sus colegas.
Lo cierto es que no es la primera foto de una caída en un juego de polo que hizo pero sí es la primera que mandó al certamen reconocido internacionalmente. La imagen fue hecha para el diario La Nación donde Emiliano es colaborador permanente con una cámara Canon EOS 1 D Mark IV que cada tres disparos genera una foto que parece algo relacionado a los viejos procesos de separación de colores. “Eso es trabajar en Argentina”, comentó, reconociendo que también hubo un factor de suerte porque la foto ganadora podría haber sido la del error, imposible de publicar.
-Cuál es el estado del fotoperiodismo en Argentina?
-Lamentablemente somos operadores de cámara más que fotoperiodistas, es muy difícil ejercer la profesión en un país donde los medios de comunicación no le dan importancia al que genera imágenes, donde diarios como Perfil despide a colegas y en donde en vez de pensar en la imagen como una redimensión del discurso se busca legitimar literalmente el texto con la imagen.
-Qué opinás sobre el dato de que entre un 8 y 9 por ciento de las imágenes preseleccionadas por el jurado del WPP para ser premiadas terminaron siendo descalificadas porque había algún tipo de manipulación?
-Me cuesta entender mucho a un fotógrafo que altera las imágenes, es como perder el sentido del oficio. Es, quizá, cierta necesidad de legitimarse a cualquier precio en vez de prestarle atención a lo que uno hace. Es una especie de trampa de este sistema. Supongo que los fotógrafos que alteran o suprimen cosas necesitan legitimarse en un sistema perverso para trabajar más o para conseguir trabajo donde quieren o necesitan en vez de pensar en lo genuino de la fotografía.
-A que te referís con perverso? Dónde se origina esa perversidad?
-Es originada en los medios y fotógrafos que quieren la legitimación de los premios. La sensibilidad del fotógrafo es rápidamente reemplazada por el proceso de los archivos RAW, la supresión de objetos y de otras alteraciones superficiales que inician una carrera hacia la foto efectista. Y ceder ante el pedido del sistema es lo que me parece perverso. Veo a muchos colegas más preocupados en qué es lo que van a hacer con las fotos y no en qué es lo que van a decir con ellas.
-Cambió mucho la fotografía de deportes desde tus comienzos?
-La superación constante en la tecnología hace que tener una foto standard de deportes sea mas accesible, que lo único que separa para obtener ese tipo de foto es el poder adquisitivo para tener el equipo adecuado. El tema es dar una vuelta más a eso y tratar de buscar la estética y la composición dentro de un momento irrepetible y etéreo. Antes me preocupaba por tener la acción que estaba sucediendo, ahora tengo la tranquilidad para buscar el lugar desde donde quiero hacer la acción que va a suceder.
-La fotografía de deportes es un oasis respecto a otras categorías del fotoperiodismo? me refiero a que sigue habiendo dinero para enviar fotógrafos a hacer viajes y son coberturas concretas.
-Es donde uno puede hacer una diferencia respecto a un aficionado o alguien que no está preparado de esa manera. Los medios siguen justificando las coberturas de eventos deportivos. Es una posibilidad de salir de lo cotidiano, no lo llamaría oasis sino una posibilidad.
-Para salir de lo cotidiano en qué sentido?
-Para salir de esa literalidad de la que hablaba antes.
Aunque exitoso en el rubro de deportes, Emiliano confiesa estar mas interesado “en lo documental, en fotos más estéticas o poéticas hechas durante algún tipo de evento periodístico”. También practica con entusiasmo sus habilidad para realizar y editar video.
Un dato curioso es que es amigo y se crió junto otro argentino premiado por el WPP en 2001, Carlos Barría. Ambos, estudiaron en el escuela de fotoperiodismo de la Asociación de Reporteros Gráficos de Argentina (ARGRA), donde también se formaron otros argentinos galardonados por el mismo premio, Rodrigo Abd y Walter Astrada.

Photo Emiliano Lasalvia

Photo Emiliano Lasalvia

foto Emiliano Lasalvia

foto Emiliano Lasalvia

Foto Emiliano Lasalvia

Foto Emiliano Lasalvia

foto Emiliano Lasalvia

foto Emiliano Lasalvia

Discovering the obvious (en español al final)

•February 20, 2014 • Leave a Comment

“Paint your town and you will paint the world”, as L. Tolstoi said, is a sentence that describes pretty well the method of the Dutch photographer Peter de Krom whose ability to find humans, and sometimes animals, during ambiguous moments results in photos of ordinary moments that look extraordinary. I like the freshness and sense of humor of the best of his work so I contacted him and he kindly agreed to do this interview (Note: I recommend to enlarge the photos):

Untitled

-Please, can you present yourself, what is your occupation? Where you live? Do you have a formal education or did you just start to take pictures? How did you come to get hooked on photography and with street photography?
-I live and work in the small whimsical town of Hoek van Holland, the Netherlands. Here I create my own photographic series that tell small stories about the Dutch culture. A common theme in my work is peculiar human behavior, which I like to exploit with a biological and anthropological interest. My work can seem distant, but I like to explore my subjects as if I’m discovering something completely new, even though it’s very common. This way my subjects hopefully tell most of the story themselves and not just me or the framing.
I work as a photographer for the Dutch newspaper ‘NRC Next’ and ‘NRC Handelsblad’. I started there as an intern while I was studying documentary photography at the St. Joost academy for fine arts. After my graduation in 2010 I got the opportunity to keep working for both newspapers on a regular basis. Besides this I work for some other (commercial) clients as well.
Just like most people I got into photography by accident. I bought a camera out of boredom once and eventually discovered a way to tell stories. First you photograph your own dog and some architecture from all angles, but slowly I realized that I was also able to document a certain way of looking to the society around me. Because I wanted to learn more about documentary photography I went to Art School. There I found out that I could actually turn my way of thinking into images.

Untitled

Untitled

-Why do you make street photography? What motivates you?
-I don’t consider myself a street photographer. I just depend on the streets to come up with subjects I want to explore further. Street Photography is a way for me to make sketches for bigger works. I see it as a tool, not as a goal on itself. Almost all the work from my ‘Sketchbook’ (on Flickr) has been shot in Hoek van Holland, my hometown, where I live just to make work. When I’m visiting the city I don’t really think about bringing my camera. So in the essence I guess I’m not like most street photographers you see with camera’s around there neck most of the time.

Untitled

Untitled

-How do you deal with your job time?
-I work on assignments about three days a week. I use the other days to make my own work, which I then publish and also generates some income.
-I see you work on series like documental essays. Why? Do you work on several projects at the same time? Are they obsessions or are they chosen by chance?
-The series I make sometimes come by chance, but mostly it’s indeed (also) a obsession. It gives you the opportunity to work with narratives and tell stories in exciting ways. It pushes you to think about your work from the perspective of the viewer, wondering how they go from image to image and what this does to their imagination.
I’m currently working on four projects at the same time. Some of them take years, others just a few months. I’m always working on something. Sometimes together with a writer.
With my series I’m currently discovering my hometown all over again. ‘Hoek van Holland’ (Hook of Holland) is a strange place where almost everything that’s typical Dutch is being pushed into a small corner. It’s a wonderful cocktail of typical Dutch ingredients. With the use of series I can tell a different story about this town (and the entire country) every time.

Untitled

Untitled

-In most of your photos there is a lot of space, why do you do this? Is it a technical matter? For example you use a fixed wide angle lens and have no time to go close.
-Indeed there is a lot of space in my photo’s, but I just see it as relevant context. I allow room for other elements that can matter and give a sense of neutrality. It also brings some peace and serenity that makes you less present as a photographer. I believe viewers feel more like an audience this way, like if they are seeing this themselves. This is why I love taking photographs with the 35mm prime lens. It’s almost equivalent to the human eye.
-Do you have favorites places or moments to find potential images?
-Almost every weekend I take my moped to drive to different places in my town. I visit the beach, the pier, the boulevard and some other crowded places to take some shots. During the weekdays I go on foot, walking around in the normal residential areas, hoping to find everyday situations.

Untitled

Untitled

-When you miss a shot, how you deal with it?
-I try to forget them as soon as possible. Thanks for bringing them up :)
-What kind of equipment you use? What is inside of your usual bag? (not only photographic things). I mean, maybe you hear music or have some amulet.
-I use a 5D Mark III and the 35mm L USM or 24-70mm L II USM lens. In some cases there’s also a 580EXII flash on top. Other stuff I take a long is a notebook, business cards and a good mood. I never go out cranky, because I have noticed photography just makes it worse.
-How is your process of editing?
-There’s not much editing in my images. I just load them in Adobe Lightroom and do some basic adjustments. I don’t really like it when photographers overuse the options as a ‘effect’ instead as a instrument. I even get bored with black and white pretty fast too, unless it’s really necessary for the image. As soon as a image is black and white I feel tricked and looking at a effect instead of a real life situation.
-And how is your process of editing but in the sense of picking the best photos?
Choosing photos for series is the most difficult thing. You kill some darlings along the way every time. What helps for me is using flickr as a sketchbook . The strange thing is that I look at my pictures differently as soon as they are ‘online‘. Somehow the picture get’s more real. It’s ‘out there’ for others to see, making you more critical. It’s something psychological that works for me.
Working to the final selection of a series I always ask friends, my intern or students from art school for help. Sometimes I also ask my mom, because she has the sober view on photographs that you’re losing in time as a photographer.
It’s also a good thing to let you’re images rest for a while. Like months, giving yourself the opportunity to forget about the moment you took the photo. Otherwise emotions/feelings from that moment can get in the way of being objective to your own shots.
-Do you make prints? When?
-I mostly make prints for exhibitions. But when I’m working on a big series with a lot of material to choose from I make small prints and look for a big room to do some editing with others.

Untitled

Untitled
-What you consider are the main difficulties to do the kind of photography you do?
-What makes it difficult right now is the solitude. Because I just live in Hoek van Holland for the photography I miss out on a lot of stuff friends are doing in the cities. I’m always right in the middle of my photography with just a few other distractions.
Money and enough assignments is the other thing. I have to be very productive to be noticed enough and keep selling my work. In these days, with so many talented photographers, you are forgotten by a mouse click.
-I read that you joined a collective. Why? What are your common objectives?
-The collective ECHIE was started by Caspar Claassen. We joined forces together with Regina van der Kloet and Peter Gerritsen because we had a feeling that our kind of photography was not recognized by the big public in the Netherlands, even though Street Photography has never been so popular.
-Why do you think it is important get more recognition for this kinds of photos, what are they showing that is not in the usual world of fine art photos?
-I wouldn’t call our photos Fine Art, but we notice that by combining our strengths, our images can have a much stronger expression, telling stories about our shared surroundings. The great amount of street photography, especially in the Netherlands from amateurs, sometimes dominates over the quality that is out there. Working as a collective gives you the opportunity to rise above this.

Untitled


Descubriendo lo obvio

“Pinta tu aldea y pintarás el mundo”, como León Tolstoi dijo, es una frase que describe bastante bien el método del fotógrafo holandés Peter de Krom cuya habilidad para encontrar humanos, y a veces animales, durante momentos ambiguos resulta en fotos de momentos ordinarios que se ven como extraordinarios. Me gusta la frescura y el sentido de humor de lo mejor de su trabajo así es que lo contacté y él accedió amablemente a esta entrevista (Nota: recomiendo ampliar las fotos):
-Por favor, podrías presentarte, cuál es tu ocupación, dónde vivís, tuviste una educación formal o sólo empezaste a hacer fotos? Cómo te enganchaste con la fotografía y en particular con la fotografía callejera?
-Vivo y trabajo en un pequeño y caprichoso pueblo de Hoek van Holland, Holanda. Aquí creo mis series fotográficas que cuentan pequeñas historias sobre la cultura holandesa. Un tema común en mi trabajo es la conducta humana, la cual me gusta explotar con intereses biológicos y antropológicos. Mi trabajo puede parecer distante pero me gusta explorar mis sujetos como si estuviera descubriendo algo completamente nuevo, aunque sea algo muy común. De esta forma espero que mis sujetos cuenten la historia por ellos mismos y no por mí o mi encuadre.
Trabajo como fotógrafo para el diario holandés NRC Next y NRC Handelsblad. Empecé allí como interno mientras estaba estudiando fotografía documental en la Academia de Bellas Artes St. Joost. Después de mi graduación en 2010 tuve la oportunidad de seguir trabajando para ambos periódicos. Aparte de esto trabajo para otros clientes comerciales también.
Como a mucha gente me metí en la fotografía por accidente. Compré una cámara para salir del aburrimiento y eventualmente descubrí una forma de contar historias. Primero hacés fotos de tu perro y algo de arquitectura desde algunos ángulos pero lentamente me di cuenta de que también podía documentar cierta forma de mirar la sociedad que me rodea. Como quise aprender mas sobre fotografía documental fui a la escuela de arte. Allí encontré que podía cambiar mi modo pensar sobre las imágenes.
-Por qué haces fotografía callejera, qué te motiva?
-No me considero un fotógrafo callejero. Es sólo que dependo de las calles para alcanzar a los sujetos que quiero explorar. La fotografía callejera es para mí una forma de tomar apuntes para trabajos más grandes. La veo como una herramienta, no un fin en sí mismo. Casi toto el trabajo de mi libro de notas (en Flickr) ha sido fotografiado en Hoek van Holland, mi ciudad natal, donde vivo para hacer mi trabajo. Cuando estoy visitando la ciudad realmente no pienso en llevar mi cámara. Así que en esencia supongo que no soy como la mayoría de los fotógrafos callejeros que ves con una cámara en su cuello la mayor parte del tiempo.
-Cómo te las arreglas con tu tiempo de trabajo?
-Trabajo en encargos alrededor de tres días a la semana. Uso los días restantes para mi propio trabajo los cuales publico luego y también generan algunos ingresos.
-Ví tu trabajo en series documentales. Por qué? Trabajás en varios proyectos al mismo tiempo? Son en base a obsesiones o los elegís de casualidad?
-Las series que hago a veces vienen por casualidad, pero la mayoría son sobre todo una obsesión. Te da la oportunidad de trabajar con narraciones y contar historias en formas excitantes. Te fuerza a pensar sobre tu trabajo desde la perspectiva del espectador, preguntándote como irán de una imagen a la otra y qué hace esto con su imaginación.
Estoy actualmente trabajando en cuatro proyectos al mismo tiempo. Algunos toman años, otros sólo unos pocos meses. Siempre estoy trabajando en algo. A veces junto a un escritor.
Con mis series estoy descubriendo nuevamente mi ciudad natal. Hoek van Holland (Gancho de Holanda) es un extraño lugar donde casi todo lo que es típicamente holandés es arrinconado. Es un maravilloso cocktail de típicos ingredientes holandeses. Con el uso de las series puedo contar una historia diferente sobre este pueblo (y el país entero) cada vez.
-En la mayoría de tus fotos hay un montón de espacio, por qué lo hacés? es una cuestión técnica? por ejemplo, usás un gran angular y no tenés tiempo de acercarte.
-De hecho hay mucho espacio en mis fotos pero yo sólo veo eso como contexto relevante. Dejo espacio para otros elementos que pueden importar y dar un sentido de neutralidad. Eso también genera algo de paz y serenidad que te hace menos presente como fotógrafo. Creo que los espectadores se sienten más como audiencia de esta forma, como si lo estuvieran viendo ellos mismos. Esa es la razón porque me encanta hacer fotos con un lente 35 mm fijo. Es casi equivalente al ojo humano.
-Tenés lugares o momentos favoritos para encontrar potenciales imágenes?
-Casi todos los fines de semana manejo mi ciclomotor a diferentes lugares del pueblo. Visito la playa, el muelle, el bulevar y algún otro multitudinario lugar para tirar algunas fotos. Durante los días de la semana voy a pie, camino alrededor de áreas residenciales normales esperando encontrar situaciones cotidianas.
-Cuándo perdés una foto, cuál es tu actitud?
-Trato de olvidar eso lo más rápido posible. Gracias por sacar a relucir el tema :)
-Qué tipo de equipo usás? Qué hay dentro de tu bolsa usualmente? (no sólo cosas fotográficas). Quiero decir, quizá escuchás música o tenés algún amuleto.
-Uso una 5D Mark III y un 35 mm L USM o un 24-70 mm L II USM. En algunos casos uso arriba de la cámara un flash 580EXII. Otras cosas que llevo es un libreta de notas, tarjetas de negocios y buen humor. Nunca salgo cuando estoy irritable porque me di cuenta que la fotografía sólo lo empeora.
-Cómo es tu proceso de edición?
-No edito mucho mis imágenes. Sólo las cargo en el Adobe Lightroom y hago algunos básicos ajustes. Realmente no me gusta cuando los fotógrafos exageran las opciones para obtener un efecto en lugar de usarlo como instrumento. Incluso me aburro con el blanco y negro bastante rápido también, a menos que sea realmente necesario para la imagen. Tan pronto como una imagen es en blanco y negro me siento engañado y veo un efecto en vez de una situación real.
-Y cómo es tu proceso de edición pero en el sentido de elegir tus mejores fotos?
-Elegir fotos para una serie es la cosa más difícil. Matas algunas fotos queridas cada vez que lo hacés. Lo que me ayuda es usar Flickr como una libreta de apuntes . Lo extraño es que miro mis fotos de otra forma apenas están online. De alguna forma las fotos se vuelven más reales. Están ahí afuera para que la vean otros, lo que te hace más crítico. Es algo psicológico que funciona para mí.
En el trabajo de la selección final siempre pregunto a mis amigos, mis aprendices o estudiantes de la escuela de arte en busca de ayuda. Algunas veces también le pregunto a mi madre porque tiene una mirada sobria que vos vas perdiendo en tu tiempo de fotógrafo.
Es algo útil también dejar tus imágenes descansar por un rato. Meses, dándote la oportunidad de olvidarte del momento en que tomaste la foto. De otra manera las emociones del momento se pueden meter en el camino de ser objetivo de tus propias fotos.
-Hacés copias? Cuándo?
-Mayormente para exhibiciones. Pero cuando estoy trabajando en una serie grande con un montón de material a elegir hago pequeñas copias y busco un cuarto grande donde editar con la ayuda de otros.
-Cuáles considerás son las principales dificultades para hacer el tipo de foto que hacés?
-Lo que lo hace difícil es la soledad. Como vivo en Hoek van Holland por la fotografía me pierdo un montón de cosas que mis amigos hacen en otras ciudades. Siempre estoy en el medio de mi fotografía con sólo unas pocas distracciones.
El dinero y tener los suficientes pedidos es otra cosa. Tengo que ser muy productivo para ser tenido en cuenta y mantener en venta mi trabajo. En estos días, con tantos talentosos fotógrafos, sos olvidado con un click del ratón.
-Leí que te uniste a un colectivo. Por qué? Cuáles son sus objetivos comunes?
-El colectivo ECHIE fue iniciado por Caspar Claassen. Unimos fuerzas con Regina van der Kloet and Peter Gerritsen porque sentimos que nuestra clase de fotografía no es reconocida por el gran público en Holanda, aún cuando la fotografía callejera nunca ha sido tan popular.
-Por qué pensás que es importante tener más reconocimiento por esta clase de fotos, que están mostrando que no está en el mundo de la fotografía de arte?
-No llamaría fotos de arte a las nuestras, pero nos dimos cuenta que combinando nuestros esfuerzos nuestras imágenes pueden tener una expresión más fuerte, compartir historias sobre los alrededores que compartimos. La gran cantidad de fotografía callejera, especialmente en Holanda de parte de amateurs, algunas veces domina la calidad que hay ahí afuera. Trabajando como un colectivo nos da la oportunidad de elevarnos sobre eso.

Nine percent

•February 14, 2014 • 1 Comment

“As a photographer, I reacted with real horror and considerable pain because some of the changes were materially trivial but they were ethically significant,” said Mr. Knight, who is a founding member of VII photo agency.
This comment published in the blog Lens was made over the information that more of the nine percent of the finalists images of the last Word Press Photo were disqualified because of removing information in post-processing. A thing that I can´t understand taken in account all the discussions thru all the last decade when digital took the ride of how we work. And more with all the publicity that had lately the AP pullitzer prize photographer issue when he confessed remove a camera in the down left part of one of his photos. The impressive about this nine percent is that is related only to the best of the best of the total of the photos.
I see that as a good change that sadly is a requeriment in this times. I like a lot too that the first prize was for a photo that is not about sorrow. News and life are a lot more than bad hot news.

ACTUALIZATION: Accord the British Journal of Photography was the eight percent

Nueve por ciento

“Como fotógrafo reaccioné con un horror real y considerable dolor porque algunos de los cambios eran materialmente triviales pero significativos desde el punto de vista ético”, dijo Gary Knight, quien es miembro fundador de la agencia de fotos VII.
Este comentario publicado en el blog Lens fue hecho sobre la información de que más del nueve porciento de las imágenes finalistas del último World Press Photo fueron descalificadas porque se removió información en post proceso. Una cosa que no puedo entender tomando en cuenta todas las discusiones a traves de la última década cuando lo digital tomó las riendas de como trabajamos. Y más con toda la publicidad que tuvo últimamente el asunto del fotógrafo premio Pullitzer de AP cuando confesó borrar una cámara a la izquierda de una de sus fotos. Lo impresionante sobre este nueve porciento es que está relacionado sólo a lo mejor de lo mejor del total de las fotos.
Veo que es un buen cambio que tristemente es un requerimiento en estos tiempos. Me gusta mucho también que el primer premio fue para una foto que no es sobre algo triste. Las noticias y la vida son mucho más que malas noticias de actualidad.

ACTUALIZACIÓN: De acuerdo al British Journal of Photography fue el ocho porciento

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 47 other followers